• We're all in this together-

    As a new parent, you are building your baby's future. Research shows what happens during the first three years can last a lifetime.

    Having your first child brings lots of changes. Every new parent has questions and is invited to telephone Building Healthy Families for support.
  • Infants (0-1 year of age)

    Developmental Milestones

    Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving "bye-bye" are called developmental milestones. Developmental milestones are things most children can do by a certain age. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, behave, and move (like crawling, walking, or jumping).

    In the first year, babies learn to focus their vision, reach out, explore, and learn about the things that are around them. Cognitive, or brain development means the learning process of memory, language, thinking and reasoning. Learning language is more than making sounds ("babble"), or saying "ma-ma" and "da-da". Listening, understanding, and knowing the names of people and things are all a part of language development. During this stage, babies also are developing bonds of love and trust with their parents and others as part of social and emotional development. The way parents cuddle, hold, and play with their baby will set the basis for how they will interact with them and others.

    ~Source: http://www.cdc.gov/

  • Toddlers (2-3 years of age)

    Developmental Milestones

    Skills such as taking turns, playing make believe, and kicking a ball, are called developmental milestones. Developmental milestones are things most children can do by a certain age. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, behave, and move (like jumping, running, or balancing).

    Click here for more information on toddler developmental milestones and information:

    http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ childdevelopment/ positiveparenting/pdfs/ Toddlers2-3.pdf

  • Preschoolers (3-5 years of age)

    Developmental Milestones

    Skills such as naming colors, showing affection, and hopping on one foot are called developmental milestones. Developmental milestones are things most children can do by a certain age. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, behave, and move (like crawling, walking, or jumping).

    Click here for more preschooler developmental milestones and information:
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ childdevelopment/ positiveparenting/pdfs/ Preschoolers3-5.pdf
  • Middle Childhood (6-8 years of age)

    Developmental Milestones

    Middle childhood brings many changes in a child’s life. By this time, children can dress themselves, catch a ball more easily using only their hands, and tie their shoes. Having independence from family becomes more important now. Events such as starting school bring children this age into regular contact with the larger world. Friendships become more and more important. Physical, social, and mental skills develop quickly at this time. This is a critical time for children to develop confidence in all areas of life, such as through friends, schoolwork, and sports.

    Click here for more middle childhood developmental miletsones and information:

    http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ childdevelopment/ positiveparenting/pdfs/ MiddleChildhood6-8.pdf

  • Middle Childhood (9-11 years of age)

    Developmental Milestones

    Your child’s growing independence from the family and interest in friends might be obvious by now. Healthy friendships are very important to your child’s development, but peer pressure can become strong during this time. Children who feel good about themselves are more able to resist negative peer pressure and make better choices for themselves. This is an important time for children to gain a sense of responsibility along with their growing independence. Also, physical changes of puberty might be showing by now, especially for girls. Another big change children need to prepare for during this time is starting middle or junior high school.

    Click here for more middle childhood developmental milestones and information:

    http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ childdevelopment/ positiveparenting/pdfs/ MiddleChildhood9-11.pdf

  • Teenagers (12-15 years of age)

    Developmental Milestones

    This is a time of many physical, mental, emotional, and social changes. Hormones change as puberty begins. Voices deepen, acne begins to appear, and adult physical features become more pronounced. Teenagers might be worried about these changes and how they are looked at by others. This also will be a time when your teen might face peer pressure to use alcohol, tobacco products, drugs, and to have sex. Other challenges can be eating disorders, depression, and family problems. At this age, teens make more of their own choices about friends, sports, studying, and school. They become more independent with their own personality and interests.

    Click here for more teenager developmental milestones and information:
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ childdevelopment/ positiveparenting/pdfs/ YoungTeen12-14.pdf

  • Teenagers (15‐17 years of age)

    Developmental Milestones

    This is a time of changes for how teenagers think, feel, and interact with others, and how their bodies grow. Most girls will be physically mature by now, and most will have completed puberty. Boys might still be maturing physically during this time. Your teen might have concerns about her body size, shape, or weight. Eating disorders also can be common, especially among girls. During this time, your teen is developing his unique personality and opinions. Relationships with friends are still important, yet your teen will have other interests as he develops a more clear sense of who he is. This is also an important time to prepare for more independence and responsibility; many teenagers start working, and many will be leaving home soon after high school.

    Click here for more teenager developmental milestones and information:
    http://www.cdc.gov/NCBDDD/childdevelopment/positiveparenting/pdfs/Teen15-17.pdf
    teenager
Building Healthy Families (BHF) is an independent, nonprofit family support organization, offering personalized universal family support and education programs for parents, caregivers, parents-to-be, students and children through diversified programming. At BHF, we focus on child development, age-appropriate behavior, parent-child interaction, positive discipline, and family health and safety. We promote family access to needed resources in the community and advocate for children and families.

2012 Finalist- All-America City Award "The Campaign for Grade Level Reading" sponsored by the National Civic League.

NEW
The new BHF brochure contains useful information about the programs and services offered by our organization.
Resources
School Readiness Interactive Birth to 3 — (This ZERO TO THREE Web exclusive is an interactive learning tool designed to help parents and caregivers encourage their young children's early learning.
Safe Kids Oregon — A FREE valuable resource for families and those supporting them in keeping children healthy and safe. The website provides tip sheets, educational materials, resources and research on preventing unintentional childhood injuries to children ages 0 - 19.
Family Support

Wallowa County Opportunities

NEW Parenting Now! @ Building Healthy Families (Enterprise Office) Wednesdays Apr. 16th - May 21st, 2014. 12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Parent/Child Playgroup @ Building Healthy Families (Enterprise Office) Fridays at 9:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
Family Fun Workshop Series @ Building Healthy Families (Enterprise Office) 2nd and 4th Fridays of each month from 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Baker County Opportunities

Baker City Parent/Child Playgroup (Birth to Age 5) @ the Baker County Library, Tuesdays from 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Union County Opportunities

Please check back soon for Union County opportunities.

Family Support Videos

        

        

For More Info Contact Building Healthy Families @ 541-426-9411 or email info@oregonbhf.org